Sunday, February 16, 2014

The Third Generation: Thank you for your service

From the New York Times:



WEDDINGS/CELEBRATIONS

Delia Pais and Joseph Kristol

Delia Ann Pais, a daughter of Mara D. Pais and Richard A. Pais of Bel Air, Md., is to be married Sunday evening to Joseph Max Kristol, the son of Susan S. Kristol and William Kristol of McLean, Va. Rabbi David Kalender is to officiate at the Columbus Club, an event space at Union Station in Washington.

The couple met at Harvard, from which they graduated.

The bride, 25, is a clinical research assistant in the sports medicine and shoulder service department at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York.

Her father owns Atlantic Services, a firm in Bel Air that specializes in the engineering and inspection of boiler systems.

The groom, 26, is a consultant at McKinsey & Company, the management consultancy in New York. From 2009-13, he served in the Marine Corps as an infantry officer with the Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, based in Camp Pendleton, Calif. He served in Afghanistan from September 2010 to April 2011. From September 2012 to May 2013, he was a part of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, which toured the Middle East and parts of Africa. He was last stationed at Camp Pendleton, having achieved the rank of captain.

His father is the editor of The Weekly Standard in Washington.

OYE Comment:  We thank Joseph Kristol, grandson of Irving Kristol, for his service to our country and wish the couple all the best for a wonderful and happy life together.
-

Labels: , , ,

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Picking up their check

OYE 109 in action, from Letters to the Editor of The Washington Post:

Is gratitude to American military personnel misplaced? Published November 19


I was troubled by Chris Marvin’s Nov. 11 op-ed, “You’re welcome,” and letter writer Richard Lampl’s Nov. 15 response “Showing gratitude where it’s due.” My husband and I always make a point of thanking military personnel, and on many occasions we have anonymously picked up the tab of servicemen if we are dining at the same restaurant. Saying “thank you for your service,” while cliched, seems to me to be a very appropriate way to show our appreciation of what they do. But it seemed these two writers were saying they don’t want such expressions of gratitude from rank-and-file Americans.
Do many military personnel feel this way? If so, we’ll stop saying thank you. Call me old-fashioned, but I still believe that “thank you” and “have a nice day” mean something when spoken from the heart.
Mindy Conway, Centreville, VA  

Thursday, November 14, 2013

from The Washington Post

A Letter to the Editor, published November 10, 2013.

Making the choice to serve in the military


There's a bumper sticker I occasionally see that reads, "If You Love Your Freedom, Thank a Vet."


I suggest that if you love your freedom, consider becoming a vet. Think about donning a uniform yourself, or talk to your children about joining the military after high school or college. Citizenship comes with responsibilities, such as voting, obeying the law, respecting the rights of others and defending the republic. Somebody has to do it. Why not you? Why not your kid?

The fact is that we need most people to be productive members of the private sector, engaging honorably in the commerce that drives our economy.  We should rightly respect those who choose to contribute in ways other than military Service.  Choosing the uniform is a very personal decision.  Indeed, it is a choice that we are blessed to have; some nations still have universal compulsory military service.

Unfortunately, however, I think many — if not most — people don’t make a choice not to serve; they never consider it among their options in the first place. 
Peter Haas, Manassas, VA
Updated OYE Comment:  Welcome to Operation Yellow Elephant.  By this, we mean that we applaud - and agree with - the views you express.  Members of Operation Yellow Elephant are NOT the Yellow Elephants themselves; quite the contrary.  We, along with you, merely ask that those eligible to serve, who support what our country is trying to do through military action overseas, consider joining our military themselves.  Thank you.

Monday, December 24, 2012

The New York Times Blows It Again!

Frankly, if the New York Times cannot - still - understand basic military terminology, they should stop writing about national security; influential Americans should no longer pay attention to the Times, due to lack of confidence in their competence.

From an otherwise unrelated obituary on former Federal Appeals Court Judge, and unsuccessful Supreme Court nominee, Robert Bork:
A View Made Clear
One of his opinions, in Dronenburg v. Zech in 1984, dealt with the Navy’s power to fire a veteran for consensual homosexual activity. Judge Bork not only granted the Navy that power, but he also took the opportunity to make clear that a right of privacy did not exist in the Constitution. “If the revolution in sexual mores that appellant proclaims is in fact ever to arrive,” he wrote, “we think it must arrive through the moral choices of the people and their elected representatives, not through the ukase of this court.”

OYE Comment:

James L. Dronenburg was a Sailor when he was kicked out of the Navy.  He only became a "veteran" after he had served, i.e., after he was kicked out.  Granted, his case only got to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit after he was discharged, and was fighting it.  However, it would be more correct to say that the Navy fired a Sailor, not a veteran.

Hel-lo!
-

Labels: , ,

Monday, August 06, 2012

Go Tigers!


Thank you to Clemson University for truly supporting Veterans.

Rodriguez found out this week he had been cleared by the NCAA and the Atlantic Coast Conference to join Clemson's football team as a walk-on receiver.

Once Rodriguez trots onto the practice field Friday in his orange No. 83 for Clemson's first practice, he'll complete a transformation from a struggling teenager to a young man who's achieved his goal after witnessing some of the most horrific fighting in Afghanistan.

"It's been kind of long journey," he said Wednesday.

Rodriguez played football at Brooke Point High in Stafford, Va., but acknowledged he let his parents' divorce and problems at school get the better of him. When his father Ray, died four days after graduation, Rodriguez was devastated and seeking a way out. He chose the Army.

"I went to the recruiter and said, 'Get me away from here,'" Rodriguez said.

Rodriguez served in Iraq during the troop surge of 2007. On his second tour, he found himself in Afghanistan and in the line of fire during one of the war's bloodiest fights, the battle of Kamdesh in October 2009.

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Deployed Servicemen Votes Not Counting

This is bullshit.

But the issue is a bigger concern during a presidential election year with a military force totaling more than 3 million, including active-duty and reserve forces.

In 2010, of the approximately 2 million military and overseas voters accounted for in data reported by the states to the Election Assistance Commission, only 4.6 percent of those voters were able to cast an absentee ballot that counted, according to the Military Voter Protection Project’s analysis of that data from the federal Election Assistance Commission, which tracks participation in voting. That compared with 5.5 percent in 2006, which was also a midterm election, the organization concluded.

Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/2012/06/27/2332178/tens-of-thousands-of-service-members.html#storylink=cpy#storylink=cpy#storylink=cpy

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Another Correction of the Day: The New York Times: Hel-lo!

The New York Times has done it again.

OBITUARIES
An obituary on Friday about Wesley A. Brown, the first black graduate of the United States Naval Academy, referred incorrectly to Mr. Brown and other students at the academy. They are called midshipmen, not cadets. (Students at the United States Military Academy at West Point are cadets.)
OYE Comment:

One would think that The New York Times would try to do a better job about knowing basic facts about our military.  Think again.

Labels: